When to Appoint A Monitor For Your Power of Attorney

 

The Elder Law Minute TM

 

 

When to Appoint A Monitor For Your Power of Attorney

 

 

 

By Ronald A. Fatoullah Esq. and Debby Rosenfeld Esq.

 

The new power of attorney law in New York has been in effect since September 2009 and it is probably still too early to measure its intended success. Through the legislation, many provisions were added to protect the financial well-being and safety of the individual granting the powers (the “principal”). There was significant concern that under the former law, elderly individuals were particularly vulnerable due to the broad powers inherent in the document.

 

We know that a power of attorney can be an exceptionally effective estate and elder law planning tool if it is drafted correctly and contains all of the necessary powers. When meeting with clients, we stress that having such a properly drafted and executed power is one of the most important documents to have. For the short-sighted individual who, for whatever reason, does not wish to move forward with asset protection planning at the moment, executing a broad and expansive power of attorney that has been modified to his/her specific needs will enable planning to be effectuated at a later point in time. 

 

Very often, individuals executing a power of attorney have no problem deciding on an agent or agents to appoint. Typically, family members and children are selected by the principal to act on the principal’s behalf. The most requisite element is that of trust. If the principal trusts the agent implicitly, he can have peace of mind that the agent will act in his best interests in the future. Sometimes, however, the principal has doubts about the agent. Individuals might not entirely trust their relatives, or they might trust their relatives but may question the relatives’ ability to act as agent, or they might simply not have any close family members to name as agent(s).  

 

In such a predicament, the principal has a few options. First, the power of attorney provides that more than one agent can be appointed at the same time, and both or all agents must act together. This may ultimately present an administrative burden, but it will ensure that there is some type of check and balance system in place. Of course, the principal can name 2 or more agents to act separately, and although this would make it easier for the agents to act, this would provide no check and balance protection.

 

Further, the law gives the principal the ability to appoint a “monitor” to oversee the actions of the agent. This is an added measure that the new legislation included in order to protect the principal from potential abuse by the agent. The monitor has the ability to request and receive a record of all financial transactions performed by the agent. If the agent does not comply, the monitor also has the ability to compel the agent to furnish these records. The monitor can also request a copy of the power of attorney from the agent. While the law does not impose a fiduciary duty on the monitor, such an appointment would generate a sense of vigilance in the agent, as he/she knows that someone is potentially reviewing his actions.  

 

As indicated above, it is critical to have an updated, comprehensive and properly executed power of attorney that complies with the statute. We urge our readers not to simply download a power of attorney form from the intenet, as that document will not set forth needed provisions and will not provide needed protection. And, for those who have concerns about the trustworthiness or financial prudence of an appointed agent, selecting a monitor to oversee everything is a wonderful and viable option. 

 

Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq. is the principal of Ronald Fatoullah & Associates, a law firm that concentrates in elder law, estate planning, Medicaid planning, guardianships, estate administration, trusts and wills. The firm has offices in Forest Hills, Great Neck, Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Cedarhurst, NY. Mr. Fatoullah has been named a “fellow” of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys and is a former member of its Board of Directors. He also served on the Executive Committee of the Elder Law Section of the New York State Bar Association for over 15 years. Mr. Fatoullah has been Certified as an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation. Mr. Fatoullah is a co-founder of Senior Umbrella Network of Queens. This article was written with Debby Rosenfeld, Esq., a senior staff attorney at the firm. Ronald Fatoullah & Associates can be reached by calling (718) 261-1700, 516-466-4422, or toll free at 1-877-ELDER-LAW or 1-877-ESTATES.

Authored by: Ron Fatoullah

Ron Fatoullah- Esq.

For more than 30 years, Ronald Fatoullah & Associates has been providing New Yorkers with legal advice that transcends traditional ways of thinking.

The firm’s attorneys are accomplished in Elder Law, Estate Planning, Medicaid Eligibility & Applications, Special Need Planning, Preparation of Wills & Trusts, Planning for Same Sex Couples, Long Tern Care, Guardianships, Veteran's Planning, Real Estate & Probate.

To help encourage the public to plan ahead, Mr. Fatoullah is a familiar face on the lecture circuit, and lectures frequently on elder law, estate planning and special needs. He is an in-demand consultant to attorneys, accountants, social workers, hospital administrators, financial planners, and to numerous organizations and corporations. He has an eight year inclusion in New York Magazine as "One of the New York Area's Best Lawyers®" in the fields of elder law, trusts and estates, and a five year inclusion in the New York Times Magazine, as a “Superlawyer”, in the fields of elder law and estate planning. Attorney Fatoullah is the co-author of the “CPA’s Guide to Long Term-Care”, published by AICPA, and he has been quoted in the New York Times, Newsday, USA today, The New York Law Journal, The Wall Street Journal, and various additional publications. His column,“The Elder Law Minute™ is published in the Queens Courier Newspaper, and he currently teaches elder law and estate planning courses.http://elderlaw-newyork.com/index.html

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